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Here are four of Bologna‘s better ristoranti…according to Fodor’s:

> Da Cesari
A: Via dei Carbonesi, 8 (South of Piazza Maggiore) W: www.da-cesari.it Hours: Closed Sun., Aug., and 1 wk in Jan. Reservations essential.
Fodor’s Review: “Just off Piazza Maggiore, this one-room restaurant has white tablecloths, dark-wood paneling, and wine bottle–lined walls. Host Paolino Cesari has been presiding over his eatery since 1955, and he and his staff go out of their way to make you feel at home. The food’s terrific—if you love pork products, try anything on the menu with mora romagnola. Paolino has direct contact with the people who raise this breed that nearly became extinct (he calls it “my pig”). The highly flavorful meat makes divine salame, among other things. All the usual Bolognesi classics are here, as well as—in fall and winter—an inspired scaloppa all Petroniano (veal cutlet with prosciutto and fontina) that comes smothered in white truffles.

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> Da Giannini a La Vecia Bulagna
A: Via Clavature 18, Piazza Maggiore; Tel#: 051-229434; Hours: No dinner Sun. Closed Mon; Reservations essential.
Fodor’s Review: “Locals simply call it “da Gianni,” and they fill these two unadorned rooms at lunch and dinner. Though the interior is plain and unremarkable, it doesn’t much matter—this place is all about food. The usual starters such as a tasty tortellini in brodo are on hand, as are daily specials such as gnocchi made with pumpkin, then sauced with melted cheese. Bollito misto (mixed meats boiled in a rich broth) is a fine option here, and the cotechino con purè di patate (a deliciously oily sausage with mashed potatoes) is elevated to sublimity by the accompanying salsa verde.

> Divinis
A: Via Battiebecco, 4/C; Piazza Maggiore; Tel#: 051-2961502; W: www.divinis.it; Hours: Closed Sun. Reservations essential.
Fodor’s Review: “Bottles lining the walls on both floors of this spot are a testimony to its commitment to serving fine wines, whether by the glass or by the bottle. The wine list runs to 102 pages—and terrific food accompanies the wines. Cheese and cured meat plates are on offer, as are superlative soups, salads, and secondi on a menu that changes frequently. Special events, such as wine tastings and tango dancing, happen throughout the week. Divinis’s continuous opening hours, a rarity in Italy, are an added plus. You could have a coffee at 11 am or a glass of wine well after midnight.

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> Marco Fadiga Bistrot
A: Via Rialto, 23/C; Tel#: 051-220118; W: www.marcofadigabistrot.it; Hours: No lunch; closed Sun. and Mon. Reservations essential.
Fodor’s Review: “If you’re looking for terrific food and something out of the ordinary—an Italian restaurant that also serves non-Italian food—dine at this French-styled bistrot: a warren of brilliantly colored rooms lit by chandelier. Chef Marco Fadiga has spent much time in England and France, and their culinary influences show. What’s on offer each night is written on a blackboard, which is brought to the table. You can have marvelous raw oysters, as well as the plateau (a very un-Italian assortment of raw things from the sea). Traditionalists will thrill to his tortellini in brodo, and adventurous sorts might like the tartare di orata (sea bream tartare) served with fresh and candied fruit.

Source: Fodor’s.